plaquesandtangles
 //   //  October 24, 2013  //  No Comments

New Possible Markers for Alzheimer’s Identified

Most researchers now agree that one cause of the Alzheimer’s is an accumulation of beta amyloid that results in the plaques we’ve written so much about in the past.  There likely are other factors as well, […]

Alzheimers Prevention
 //   //  October 22, 2013  //  No Comments

Sleep to Avoid Alzheimer’s?

We’ve known for decades that sleep is important, particularly for the brain. We’ve also know that sleep is an important time for the storage of memories, and with too little sleep memory is negatively affected. Now, […]

pills
 //   //  October 21, 2013  //  No Comments

Blood Pressure Medications and Dementia: New Findings

Johns Hopkins researchers have recently shown that certain blood pressure medications seem to have a protective benefit when it comes to developing dementia. Importantly, though, it was only certain classes of medications that seemed to help. […]

graph
 //   //  October 16, 2013  //  No Comments

Movement, Sleep and Alzheimer’s Disease

Scientists continue to search for new and easier ways to identify Alzheimer’s disease early in it’s course in order to (hopefully) provide better and more timely intervention. Most of what we’ve reported on, and that has […]

Exercise
 //   //  October 15, 2013  //  No Comments

Exercise and the Brain

You’ve seen us write extensively about the benefits of exercise for the brain and it’s general protective effects. What we haven’t known is the mechanism(s) that is/are involved.  Now, however, researchers have given us some great […]

New Possible Markers for Alzheimer’s Identified

Written by  //  October 24, 2013  //  Alzheimer's Disease, beta-amyloid, biomarkers  //  No comments

Most researchers now agree that one cause of the Alzheimer’s is an accumulation of beta amyloid that results in the plaques we’ve written so much about in the past.  There likely are other factors as well, as we’ve also discussed, but beta amyloid is clearly part of the story.  We also have reason to believe that something happens to the garbage collection system of the brain that essentially lets the beta amyloid accumulate, and if we can somehow identify and correct this process early on, then obviously it would be of immense clinical benefit. Furthermore, we have reason to believe that lysosomes are involved in this garbage collection process.   Fortunately there are some new data that may help with early identification and possible treatment within this system.

Katarina Kågedal and researchers recently showed that, “In victims of Alzheimer’s, something happens to the lysosomes so that they can’t manage to take care of the surplus of beta amyloid. They fill up with junk that normally is broken down into its component parts and recycled.”   She led the study  being published in Neuromolecular Medicine, where their hypothesis was that these changes in the brain’s lysosomal network could be reflected in the spinal fluid.  They studied samples  from 20 Alzheimer’s patients and an equal number of healthy control subjects and examined  35 proteins that are associated with the lysosomal network.  What they found was that six of these proteins were at increased levels in those with Alzheimer’s, and all of these are new potential markers, and possible routes for intervention.

What’s most exciting about these data is that we are beginning to more fully understand how the garbage collection system in the brain works, and how it doesn’t, which can lead to numerous disorders, not the least of which is Alzheimer’s. There’s still more that we don’t know, but at least we are beginning to unravel this part of the mystery, and it looks like it could lead to earlier diagnosis and well as new treatments.

We’ll keep you posted.

Dr. V

plaquesandtangles
New Possible Markers for Alzheimer’s Identified
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